Edward Tyldesley 1679-1725

Edward Tyldesley was the eldest son of Thomas Tyldesley the Diarist and his first wife Eleanor Holcroft. Edward was born in 1679. He married Dorothy and they had at least two children:

In 1715, Edward Tyldesley took up arms for the Pretender, joined the Rebels at Lancaster on 12 November, and marched into Preston at the head of a troop of men. With the collapse of the rebellion he was arrested and tried for treason with the other Preston Prisoners. Patten suggests that the decision of the jury to acquit Edward Tyldesley may have been bought:

Edward Tyldesley of the Lodge, a Papist, Lancashire, was acquitted by the Jury at the Marshalsea, tho' it was proved he had a Troop and entered Preston at the Head of eight with his Sword drawn. But his Sword had a Silver Handle.

Surprise at the verdict was also expressed by Baron Montague, who discharged the jury:

At the same Time, and before the same Judges, came on the tryal of Edward Tyldesley of the Lodge, in the County Palatine of Lancaster, Esq; against whom one of the Witnesses for the King depos'd, being in Preston, and hearing a Shout, he ran to see what was of the Matter, and heard presently that Mr Tyldesley's Troop was come: thereupon looking out, he saw him at the Head of about 20 Men, (some of them arm'd) writing with he is Sword drawn. There were other Evidences who depos'd, But they saw him come into the Town with such a A number of Men; but none of them would swear to the Particular of his Sword's being drawn, but that one; nor that he appear'd to head them any Time after, or was in any Action; but that they were always call'd Mr Tyldesley's Troop. It was prov'd that he was seen with some of the Rebels, and had din'd with them, his own Servants waiting on him.

To all which his Counsel answer'd in his Behalf, That as to the Troop's going by his Name, the Reason Had been accounted for before, in the tryal of Mr Townley. It Was true, one Evidence swore That he saw him with his Sword drawn; but it was to be observ'd, that he said it was about five or six a-Clock, which at that Time of the Year was usually dark; and the Evidence might not only be deceiv'd in the Circumstance of his Sword being drawn, but even in the Person himself; but for the latter, it would be easily shown how he came there; for which they call'd Witnesses, first Anna Maria Tyldesley, who said she was the Prisoners House Keeper: That on the Friday Morning a great Number of armed Men came to the House, and in a threatening Manner said, they would have her Master along with them: That they staid some Time, and took what the House afforded; during which they kept the Prisoner confined in a Room, and would not suffer this Deponent to go near him, swearing she should not hinder him from going with them, and accordingly took him away with them.

Next Mrs Tyldesley, the Prisoner's Mother, was call'd, and depos'd, he came to Preston on the Friday Night above mention'd, and she having no Lodging, sent to an Inn to procure him one; and that he express'd himself dissatisfy'd at his being brought thither. This was confirm'd by one Parkinson, who kept the Inn; who said farther, That the Prisoner and he talk'd of some Law Affairs, and not of any Thing relating to the Rebellion: But being ask'd where the Prisoner lay the next Night, he said, he did not know.

Anna Maria Tyldesley being ask'd by the Prisoner's Counsel, If she had not heard that he attempted to make his Escape? She said, Yes; and, among other Ways, it was once agreed that he should go away in Woman's Cloaths; and accordingly a Relation of theirs, who was a pretty bulky Woman, and of his Size, was actually undressing; but this was unresolv'd on again.

He called another Witness, who swore, That the Prisoner would have hir'd a Horse of him on Saturday Morning; and being ask'd, if the Prisoner told him where he was to go? he said, He told him he was to go Home to his own House, for his own Horses were known; and that he express'd himself to this Evidence very much concern'd at his being there: but it was strictly examin'd into, whether this was not after they heard the King's Forces were coming up? for no doubt, as it was observ'd, they would many, or all of them have been glad of any Means of escaping the Danger that threaten'd them, when they began to see that they had made a false Conjecture of the Strength of the Rebels, and the Vigilance and Activity of the King's Troops.

The Prisoner call'd Sir George Warburton, and some other Gentleman, to his Reputation, who said, they never heard him speak with Disrespects of the Government; but said he was a facetious inoffensive Man.

Upon the whole, the Jury credited the Plea, That he was brought by Violence, and kept by Constraint; for he was likewise acquitted. Upon the Acquittal of these Gentleman, especially of the two last of them, who were Men of considerable Estates, it was thought proper to discharge this Surrey Jury; and accordingly, on the 7th of May, Mr Baron Montague came to the Marshalsea-Court, where the Names of the Jury being call'd over, he repeated to them the Transactions of the Rebels taken at Preston, and took Notice of his Majesty's clemency towards them, in regard of the very few who had been executed, in Comparison of the Number of his Majesty's Soldiers and Subjects that had been murder'd by them. He said, That it seem'd very extraordinary to all good Subjects, that the Rebels who had been try'd in that court, had found so much Favour, especially Mr Townley and Mr Tyldesley, against whom the Proofs were full and strong, and the rather because five Persons whom they had drawn into the Rebellion, had been executed in the Country.

He added, That he did not charge any one particular Person of them, but it seem'd surprising that a Jury of Surrey only should so distinguish themselves: That the Panel of the Jury, out of Lenity to the Rebels, had, instead of two Days, been communicated to them above twice as many Weeks before: And in Conclusion he told them, That they were discharg'd, and might go about their Business; at which they seem'd well pleas'd. Then the Court adjourn'd to the 30th of that Month, against which Time a new Jury was impannell'd.

Despite the declining family fortunes, Edward Tyldesley still owned much land. However, the Registers of Estates of Lancashire Papists for 1717 show that there was significant debt to set against these holdings:

In Myerscough:
Capital messuage called Lodge and 400 ac. land 'a great quantity whereof is course pasture ground'. Part of demesne mortgaged to Thomas Townley, esq.by E.T.and
Thomas his decd.father, yearly value £170.17s. 11d.
Other part of demesne, 60 ac, let to John Catterall for 21 years from 2 Feb. 1697/8, rent £30. 7s. 6d. yearly. In all above E.T.has an interest for 37 years to come.
Messuage let to Thomas Richardson for 21 years from 2 Feb. 1698/9. rent £4. 9s. yearly, 4½d. for every fifteen charged on the demesne, 2 capons, 2 hens.
Barn let to Thomas Devias for 21 years from 2 Feb. 1697/8, rent £ 15 yearly, l0d. assessment, 1 capon, 2 hens.
Messuage let to William Richardson for 21 years from 14 Jan. 1697/8, rent 3s. yearly and 1d. assessment.
Messuage let to Agnes Nickson for 21 years from 1 Dec. 1697, rent 8s. yearly and 2d. assessment. In possession of Richard Bamber.
Messuage let to Anne Ribchester for 21 years from 6 Mar. 1696/7. Rent 10s.yearly and 2½d assessment.
Messuage let to James Brand for 21 years from 2 Feb. 1712/3, consideration £37, rent 10s.yearly, 2d assessment, 1 day shearing, 1 day harrowing.
Messuage let to Benjamin Cornall for 21 years from 2 Feb. 1712/3, consideration £ 130, rent £7.12s, yearly, 13d. assessment, 1 day shearing, 1 day harrowing, 1 day with a draught.
Messuage let to Henry Mawdesley for 21 years from 2 Feb. 1712/3, consideration £ 81, rent £1. 8s. yearly, 7d. assessment, 1 day shearing, 1 day harrowing.
Messuage let to John Cross for 21 years from 2 Feb. 1712/3, consideration £217, rent £3. 2s. yearly, 12d. assessment, 1 day shearing, 1 day harrowing, 1 day with a
draught.
Messuage let to Francis Mally for 21 years from 2 Feb. 1712/3, consideration £35, rent 10s. yearly, 1d assessment, 1 day shearing, 1 day harrowing, 2 capons, 2 hens.
Messuage let to Benjamin Cardwell for 21 years from 11 Jan. 1713/4, consideration £ 175, rent 50s. yearly, 12d. assessment, 2 ducks, 2 hens, 1 day shearing, 1 day
harrowing, 1 day with a draught.
Messuage let to Richard Gurnall for 21 years from 2 Feb. 1712/3, rent £ 1. 8s. yearly, 7d. assessment, 1 day shearing, 1 day harrowing, 1 day with a draught.
Messuage let to Henry Sympson for 21 years from 2 Feb. 1712/3, consideration £98, rent £1. 8s., 7d assessment, 1 day shearing, 1 day harrowing, 1 day leading turves.
Messuage let to Anne Baine for 21 years from 2 Feb. 1712/3, consideration £44, rent 12s. yearly, 3d. assessment, 1 day shearing, 1 day harrowing.
Messuage let to Anthony Lund for 21 years from 2 Feb. 1712/3, consideration £80, rent £1. 3s. 6d. yearly, 1½d. assessment, 1 day shearing, 1 day harrowing.
Messuage let to Richard Kitchen for 21 years from 2 Feb. 1712/3, consideration £ 197.10s., rent £3 yearly, 6d. assessment, 1 day shearing, 1 day harrowing, 1 day with a draught, 2 ducks, 2 hens.
Messuage let to John Brand for 21 years from 2 Feb. 1712/3, consideration £25, rent 8s. yearly, 8½d. assessment, 1 day shearing, 1 day harrowing, 1 day with a draught.
Messuage let to Ralph Briers for 21 years from 2 Feb. 1712/3, consideration £87, rent 24s. yearly, 2d. assessment, 3 days shearing, 1 day harrowing, 1 day with a draught, 4 hens, 2 ducks.
Messuage let to Henry Simpson for 21 years from 2 Feb. 1712/3, consideration £ 100, rent £1. 8s. yearly, 7d. assessment, 1 day shearing, 1 day harrowing, 1 day with a draught.
3 houses let to George Willacy and Robert Bateson for 21 years from 11 Jan. 1713/4, consideration £320, rent £8. 4s. yearly, 2 cocks, 2 hens, 5 days shearing, 3 days harrowing, 3 days with a draught.
All the above held for the remainder of 37 years.
In Holcroft in Culcheth:
Moiety of manor of Holcroft and Pesfordlong in own possession.
Capital messuage called Holcroft Hall and demesne, 120 ac., let to Elizabeth Cockett for 1 year, rent £105, subject to payment of 10s. to Dame Margaret Stanley, widow, being her moiety of rent of the Miln Ground.
2 closes, 6 ac, part of demesne, let to Thomas Hurst for a year, rent £5.
2 closes, 6 ac, part of demesne, let to Thomas Bradshaw for a year, rent £ 5. In possession of Thomas Yate.
Close called Royles Meadow, 2½ ac., part of demesne, let to Margaret Unsworth, widow, rent £2.10s.
2 closes, 5 ac, part of demesne, let to Jane Gregory for life, rent £3.15s. yearly.
Close called Green Field, part of demesne, 8 ac, let for a year to Henry Bate, rent £ 8.
Moss ground and moss-rooms let for a year to John Shaw, Jennet Richards, James Fazakerley, John Unsworth, John Guest, Thomas Higginson and Mary Birchall, total rents 20s.
Moiety of water corn mill in own possession.
Cottage let to John Unsworth for a year, rent 12s.
Cottage let to Richard Unsworth for a year, rent 10s.
Cottage let to Edward Scholefield for a year, rent 10s.
Cottage and yard let to Thomas Radcliff, decd., consideration £ 5.10s. rent 2s. and 2s. in lieu of boons. In possession of James Banister.
Messuage let by grandfather Thomas Holcroft, esq. to Henry Johnson, decd., consideration £60, rent 42s.yearly and boons or 9s. In possession of John Johnson.
Messuage let to Alice Kerfoot, widow, consideration £34, rent 10s. yearly and boons or 3s. 4d. In possession of Matthew Wright.
Messuage let to Peter Unsworth, decd., consideration £18, rent 18s.4d. yearly and boons or 9s. In possession of Margery and Samuel Corless.
Messuage let to Henry Caldwell, decd., consideration £12, rent 5s. yearly. In possession of Mary Caldwell.
Messuage let to Roger Shaw, decd., consideration £30, rent 18s. 4d. yearly and boons or 6s. In possession of Ralph Prescott.
Cottage and land let to [unstated], consideration 20 marks, rent 13s. yearly and boons or 2d. In possession of William Johnson
Cottage and ground let to Edward Unsworth, decd., consideration £4, rent 8s. In possession of Margaret Unsworth.
Messuage let to Elizabeth Hurst, decd., consideration £100, rent 24s. 6d. yearly and boons or 10s. In possession of Thomas Hurst.
Messuage let to William Barrow, decd., consideration £110, rent 26s. yearly and boons or 10s. In possession of Catharine Barrow, widow, and Henry Hart.
Cottage, ground and 3r. moss let to John Bradshaw, decd., consideration £5, rent 5s. yearly and boons or 10d. In possession of Thomas Yate.
Messuage called the Worlds End let to Jane Gregory, widow, consideration £17, rent 12s. yearly and boons or 3s. In possession of J. G. and Mary Hindley.
Messuage let to Ellis Green, decd., consideration £46, rent 20s. yearly and boons or 6s. In possession of Ellen Green and Henry Rawson.
Messuage let to Ralph Radcliffe, consideration £4, rent 5s. yearly and boons or 1s. 2d. In possession of Thomas Radcliffe.
Messuage let to Thomas Mather, consideration £7.10s., rent 3s. yearly and boons or 1. 10d.
Messuage let to John Shaw, consideration £28, rent 13s. yearly and boons or 3s.10d.
Messuage let to Hamlet Linford, consideration £20, rent 1s. 8d. yearly and a boon or 4d. In possession of Enoch Clark.
Messuage let to Henry Bate, consideration £10, rent 4s. yearly and boons or 1s. 6d.
Messuage let to Richard Green, consideration £80, rent 40s. yearly and boons or 10s. In possession of John Battersby and James Bate.
In Astley:
Capital messuage called Morleys with demesne, 112 ac. and moiety of tithes of corn, let for 7 years to William Wright, rent £110 yearly.
In Thornton:
Cottage and garden let to Edward Helme, rent 2s.4d. yearly 2 hens.
Cottage and garden let by John Anderton, gent, to Mary Hodgson, rent 2s. 4d. yearly.
Cottage and garden let to William Fisher, tailor, rent 2s. 4d. yearly, 2 chickens.
Cottage and garden let to Thomas Whiteside, consideration £7.10s., rent 1s. 8d, yearly and 2 ducks.
Cottage and garden let to William Fisher, husbandman, rent 2s. 4d, yearly and 2 hens.
In Hambleton:
Messuage let by grandfather Edward Tyldesley, to Thomas Thurnall, rent 5s. yearly, 2 hens.
The tithes of corn and grain in Thornton computed to be £50 farmed for a year by Robert Hall; Carleton £60, Edward Walker and Robert Atkinson; Bispham £20,
Alexander Smithson; Hardhorn cum Newton £70 Thomas Roe, gent. and John Ryley.
The tithes of wool and lamb in Thornton, Bispham cum Norbrecke, Layton cum Warbrecke, Marton, Carleton and Poulton farmed for a year by Henry Walsh and
Thomas Pickupp, rent £4.
All the above, except Myerscough, subject to debts of £4000 and £1500; also £2500 to Robert Parker of Extwisle, esq. and to charge of £500 to aunt Anna Maria Tyldesley.
Mortgage of Myerscough to Mr.Townley for £1000.
Chief rents from Astley—[blank] Mort, esq. £5.12s. 6d., [blank]
Starkie, widow, 12s. 6d., Bertie Entwisle, esq. 12s. 6d.
To Alice Bradshaw, widow, 10d. yearly for a way.

By 1725, Edward Tyldesley was dead, succeeded by his son, James Tyldesley.

References
  1. The History of the Rebellion in the year 1715, The Revd. Robert Patten, 1745.